Sacred Bach
A Spiritual Journey
Thursday, March 23, 2017, 7:30PM
FAIRLAWN Lutheran
Friday, March 24, 2017, 8:00PM
St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, CLEVELAND HEIGHTS
Saturday, March 25, 2017, 8:00PM
St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, CLEVELAND HEIGHTS
Sunday, March 26, 2017, 4:00PM
ROCKY RIVER Presbyterian Church

Joseph Gascho, guest conductor
Molly Netter & Madeline Apple Healey, soprano | Daniel Moody, countertenor
Brian Giebler & Jacob Perry, tenor | David McFerrin, baritone
Apollo’s Singers

Cantatas No. 17 & 102
Motet BWV 230, Lobet den Herrn
Mass in G Major, BWV 236

J.S. Bach was famous for saying that the purpose of all music is “the glory of God and the refreshment of the spirit.” Guest conductor Joseph Gascho, a prize-winning harpsichordist and rising star of the American baroque scene, leads Apollo’s Fire and Apollo’s Singers in this spiritual journey.

Note: Joseph Gascho, replaces conductor Julian Wachner, who has had to withdraw due to family reasons

Pre-concert talk by oboist Debra Nagy, one hour before each performance. FREE!
Debra’s lecture will discuss Bach’s own “borrowings” from his cantatas for use in his Latin church music (such as the G major Missa Brevis BWV 236 on tonight’s program) as well as looking at affect and rhetoric in several of the arias from the cantatas BWV 102 and BWV 17.

These concerts are generously sponsored by Mrs. David Seidenfeld

  • JOSEPH GASCHO
    JOSEPH GASCHO
    guest conductor
  • MOLLY NETTER
    MOLLY NETTER
    soprano
  • MADELINE HEALEY
    MADELINE HEALEY
    soprano
  • DANIEL MOODY
    DANIEL MOODY
    countertenor

  • BRIAN GIEBLER
    BRIAN GIEBLER
    tenor
  • JACOB PERRY
    JACOB PERRY
    tenor
  • DAVID MCFERRIN
    DAVID MCFERRIN
    baritone
sacred_chorus_800

Musical Angels, detail from The Assumption of the Virgin, Carlos, Taborda Vlame Frey, (fl.1517-40) / National Museum of Ancient Art, Lisbon, Portugal / Bridgeman Images

“The U.S.A.’s hottest baroque band.” –CLASSICAL MUSIC MAGAZINE (UK)

JOSEPH GASCHO
guest conductor

Joseph Gascho enjoys a multifaceted musical career as a solo and collaborative keyboardist, conductor, teacher, and recording producer. Featuring his own transcriptions of Bach, Handel, and Charpentier, his recent debut solo recording was praised in the American Record Guide for “bristling with sparkling articulation, subtle but highly effective rubato and other kinds of musical timing, and an enviable understanding of the various national styles of 17th and 18th century harpsichord music.”

In 2002, Gascho won first prize in the Jurow International Harpsichord Competition. As a student of Webb Wiggins and Arthur Haas, he earned masters and doctoral degrees in harpsichord from the Peabody Conservatory and the University of Maryland, where he also studied orchestral conducting with James Ross.

Recent performing highlights include performing with the National Symphony at Carnegie Hall, the Mark Morris Dance Group and the Kennedy Center Opera Orchestra, and conducting Idomeneo for the Maryland Opera Studio. He has also conducted numerous operas from Monteverdi to Mozart for Opera Vivente.

At the Oberlin Conservatory’s Baroque Performance Institute, Gascho conducts the student orchestra, coaches chamber music, and teaches basso continuo. A strong proponent of technology in the arts, he has used computer-assisted techniques in opera productions, in a recent recording with the ensemble Harmonious Blacksmith and percussionist Glen Velez, and in his basso continuo classes.

In demand as a recording producer, Gascho has recently produced sessions and recordings for Pomerium, the Folger Consort, Trio Pardessus, the 21st Century Consort, Ensemble Gaudior, Three Notch’d Road, pianist/composer Haskell Small, Cantate Chamber Singers, and the Washington Master Chorale.

MOLLY NETTER
soprano

Molly Netter, soprano, enlivens complex and beautiful music, both old and new, with a voice described as “crisp and clear, white yet warm” (Seen and Heard International).

Known for having “exquisite poise” (NY Times) and “[embuing] every word of the text with signification” (The Examiner), she has performed as a soloist with the GRAMMY-nominated Choir of Trinity Wall Street, Les Canards Chantants, the Clarion Music Society, the Smithsonian Chamber Orchestra, the Albany Symphony, Yale Opera, Heartbeat Opera, and Experiments in Opera, as well as with Juilliard415 at Lincoln Center, touring internationally in Japan, Singapore and Burma under Masaaki Suzuki and with the Triplepoint contemporary/jazz ensemble.

Ms. Netter holds an ad hoc Bachelor of Music degree in composition and contemporary voice from Oberlin Conservatory and a Master’s degree in early music voice and oratorio from the Yale Institute of Sacred Music where she studied with James Taylor. Between degrees, she taught English in Kyoto, Japan.

MADELINE HEALEY
soprano

Praised by the Washington Post for her “gorgeous singing” in her Kennedy Center debut, “silken-voiced” (Cleveland Plain Dealer) soprano Madeline Apple Healey is a soloist and chamber musician based in New York, NY. Recent and upcoming engagements include the Russian premiere of Steinberg’s Passion Week with The Clarion Choir, Bach’s Mass in B Minor and Bernstein’s MASS with Choral Arts Society of Washington, Schütz’s Musikalishe Exequien at the Amherst Early Music Festival, Ticheli’s Songs of Love and Life with the Baldwin Wallace Symphonic Wind Ensemble, and the U.S. premiere of “Here All Night” with Gare St. Lazare Ireland at The White Light Festival at Lincoln Center.

Specializing in early and contemporary repertoire, recent concert work includes national tours of Monteverdi’s Vespro della Beata Vergine 1610 with Apollo’s Fire, Buxtehude’s Membra Jesu Nostri, Bach’s Magnificat and St. John Passion, Handel’s Messiah, Tarik O’Regan’s The Ecstasies Above, Crumb’s Apparition, Lang’s little match girl passion with AMPERSAND, Matsukaze by Toshio Hosokawa at the Spoleto and Lincoln Center Festivals, and the world premiere of A Woman Young and Old, a song-cycle by Michael Bennett.

Ms. Healey is equally at home in standard repertoire. Performance credits include Olympia (Les Contes d’Hoffmann) a role in which she was praised for her “crystal clear coloratura” (Princeton Town Topics), Papagena (Die Zauberflöte), Minerva (Orpheus and the Underworld), and the partial roles of Despina (Cosi fan tutte), Susanna (Le nozze di Figaro), Cunegonde (Candide), Armide (Lully’s Armide) and Cendrillon (Cendrillon).

In the fall of 2014, Madeline founded AMPERSAND, a vocally-centric project-based ensemble, with longtime friend and colleague Anna Lenti. This season she can also be heard with Apollo’s Fire, Amor Artis, Academy of Sacred Drama, The Clarion Choir, The Choir of Trinity Wall Street, The Choir of St. Luke-in-the-Fields, The Thirteen, and TENET.

Madeline holds degrees in voice from Westminster Choir College and Baldwin Wallace University, and has recorded on the NAXOS, KOCH, Pro Organo, and AVIE labels. A Cleveland native, she now resides in Brooklyn, NY, where, when she’s not making music, she can be found baking cakes, eating french fries, and hanging out with her houseplants.

WEBSITE

DANIEL MOODY
countertenor

Countertenor Daniel Moody has garnered widespread acclaim for his commanding yet expressive vocal timbre and his breathtaking musicianship. Praised as having a “vocal resonance, [which] makes a profoundly startling impression” (The New York Times) and for his “vivid and powerful” voice (The Boston Musical Intelligencer), Mr. Moody is equally known for his “sweet and melancholy sound” (The Washington Post) and ability to “pierce hearts” and “utterly silence a room” (The Boston Musical Intelligencer) with his expressivity and deep connection with audiences.

Recent opera appearances include Nerone in Monteverdi’s L’incoronazione di Poppea, the title roles in Handel’s Giulio Cesare and Rinaldo, Oberon in Britten’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and L’Enfant in Ravel’s L’Enfant et les sortileges. In Mr. Moody’s most recent role as Rinaldo, he drew attention from the San Diego Story for his unusually powerful tone: “[Mr. Moody] may help to create a new operatic vocal category: Helden Countertenor.” Mr. Moody has also appeared in Mark Morris’ productions of Britten’s Curlew River and Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas at the Tanglewood Music Festival (and again at BAM in March, 2017), where the Financial Times noted his “inspired and absorbing performances”.

A proponent of early music, Mr. Moody has performed at the Boston, Indianapolis and Washington Early Music Festivals, Maryland’s Mountainside Baroque, and Boston’s Antico Moderno,and under such conductors as Stefan Asbury, Nicholas Kramer, Ken Lam, and Lyle Nordstrom. A graduate of the prestigious Yale Voxtet – resident at Yale’s Institute of Sacred Music – he has performed as a soloist at such venues as Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall, London’s St. John’s Smith Square and, Cambridge’s Trinity College, working closely with renowned conductors David Hill, Simon Carrington, Masaaki Suzuki, and Matthew Halls. His performances have been broadcast live in concert on BBC Radio 3 in the United Kingdom, and on Boston’s WGBH, Indiana’s WFIU, WSHU’s Sunday Baroque.

Highlights of recent and 2016-17 seasons include the American premiere of George Benjamin’s Dream of the Song at the Festival of Contemporary Music at the Tanglewood Music Center, one of four vocalists in Joyce DiDonato’s Carnegie Hall opera workshop (broadcast on Medici TV), Bach’s St. Matthew Passion, Handel’s Messiah with the Charleston Symphony and Winston-Salem Symphony Orchestras, A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Oberon) at the Lakes Area Music Festival (Minnesota), and engagements with Mark Morris Dance Group, Apollo’s Fire, and Boston Symphony Orchestra covering for countertenor Bejun Mehta.

Mr. Moody is a graduate of the Peabody Conservatory (BM ’14) and sang with the Washington National Cathedral Choir during his years in Baltimore. He recently graduated with a Master’s Degree from the Yale School of Music and Institute of Sacred Music, and has won awards at the George London Competition, Handel Aria Competition, New York Oratorio Society Competition, and the Russell Wonderlic Competition.

WEBSITE

BRIAN GIEBLER
tenor

Garnering praise for his “most impressive… bright, clear tone and lively personality” (New York Times), tenor Brian Giebler has been heard singing diverse repertoire around the world. A “faultless high tenor” (Seattle Times) with “great elegance of tone and phrasing” (Baltimore Sun), Mr. Giebler has been a soloist with the Virginia Symphony Orchestra, American Classical Orchestra, Trinity Wall Street Baroque Orchestra, New York City Chamber Orchestra, Pacific Northwest Ballet Orchestra, and Saginaw Bay Orchestra, and will make his debut with the Cleveland Orchestra at Severance Hall this season. He made his Carnegie Hall solo debut in Haydn’s Missa Sancti Nicolai with the New York City Chamber Orchestra, and his Lincoln Center solo debut in Handel’s Messiah with Trinity Wall Street. Recent solo engagements include the Evangelist in Bach’s St. Matthew Passion with Trinity Wall Street, Bach’s B Minor Mass with Trinity Wall Street (“voix plus que remarquables”, Le Devoir), Monteverdi’s Vespers of 1610 with Green Mountain Project (“splendid… agile figuration”, Boston Music Intelligencer), Bach’s Magnificat with Seraphic Fire (“gleaming tones”, South Florida Classical Review), and the Carmel Bach Festival, where he was a 2015 Virginia Best Adams Fellow. Last season, Mr. Giebler was a finalist in the Tafelmusik International Vocal Competition and received Honorable Mention at the Biennial Bach Vocal Competition sponsored by the American Bach Society and the Bach Choir of Bethlehem. In 2015, he was selected as the Victoria Bach Festivals Young Artist and will attend the Oregon Bach Festival this summer (2017) as the Tenor Vocal Fellow.

Brian performs with chamber ensembles throughout the country, including GRAMMY® Award winning Conspirare of Austin, GRAMMY® nominated Seraphic Fire of Miami, GRAMMY® nominated Clarion Music Society in NYC, and he is a member of the GRAMMY® nominated Choir of Trinity Wall Street in Manhattan, where he currently resides. He can be heard frequently with the Handel and Haydn Society in Boston, Ekmeles, TENET, True Concord Artists, Blue Heron, Green Mountain Project, Yale Choral Artists, Spire Chamber Ensemble, Musica Sacra, and Sounding Light. While living in Seattle, Brian was a member of the Seattle Opera Chorus where he performed Puccini’s La Bohème and Wagner’s Götterdämmerung.

With “one of the purest tenor voices” (DramaIntheHood) “that would make anyone melt” (BroadwayWorld), Brian recently received much critical acclaim as Marius in a regional production of Les Misérables and was recently nominated for a 2014 Gregory Award (Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Musical) for his performance. An active crossover artist, Brian was also praised for his portrayal of Fabrizio in Adam Guettel’s The Light in the Piazza (Best Musical nomination, 2011 Wilde Awards), being hailed as a “powerful tenor for such a young man” (Milan News). He has played such iconic roles as Dickon in The Secret Garden, Cain/Japheth in Children of Eden, Nicely Nicely Johnson in Guys and Dolls, and Jack in Into the Woods (Best Supporting Actor, 2005 Anvil Awards). Brian covered the roles of Tony in West Side Story (Aspen), Anthony in Sweeney Todd (Aspen), and Lt. Cable in South Pacific with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra.

In 2010, Brian was seen on Philadelphia’s Fox 29 News as the 2010 Delco Idol musical theater competition winner at the Media Theatre in Pennsylvania. He was also a featured artist with the Skaneateles Music Festival in “Broadway comes to Brook Farm” under guest musical director Paul Sportelli. In Seattle, he had the pleasure of singing with the Pacific Northwest Ballet Orchestra in their 2012 Holiday production of the Seattle-favorite, The Nutty Nutcracker, inserting classical music and popular Christmas tunes over top of the sweeping Tchaikovsky score.

At a graduate student at the University of Michigan, Brian performed as Ferrando in Cosi fan Tutte and as Bardolfo in Falstaff. He has also sung the roles of Basilio in Mozart’s Le Nozze Di Figaro, Pedrillo in Die Entführung aus dem Serail, and Dr. Blind in Die Fledermaus. Brian made his international debut in Italy with the International Opera Theater of Philadelphia, premiering the operatic adaptation of Shakespeare’s La Tempesta as Ariele.

A little known fact about Brian is his expertise on trumpet. At Eastman, Brian studied in the trumpet department as a primary student and performed with the internationally acclaimed Eastman Wind Ensemble. He also performed with the Eastman Lab Jazz Band, University of Rochester Symphony Orchestra and Wind Ensemble, University of Maryland Concert Band, Philadelphia Youth Orchestra at Verizon Hall, and the University of the Arts Regional Grammy Jazz Band. In the pit, Brian played for Les Miserables (Media Theatre), Cabaret, and Assassins (Eastman).

Brian is a graduate of the University of Michigan, where he earned his masters degree in Vocal Performance. He is also an alumnus of the Royal Academy of Music in London, England, and holds a bachelors degree in Vocal Performance from the Eastman School of Music. He spent two summers (2011, 2012) as a Young Artist with the Aspen Opera Theater Center.

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JACOB PERRY
tenor

Jacob receives praise for his instincts singing in small vocal consorts in addition to his work as a soloist. He is a core tenor of the soloist-ensemble Les Canards Chantants and the chamber choir The Thirteen. Jacob can be heard singing with The Clarion Choir, ACRONYM, Piffaro, and as a featured soloist with Mountainside Baroque and Apollo’s Fire.

Born and raised in Silver Spring, Maryland, Jacob has cultivated a passion for a wide variety of music ranging from medieval folk song to the tight harmonies of vocal jazz. He has experience singing solo and chamber works by contemporary composers through engagements with Third Practice Ensemble, hexaCollective and Great Noise Ensemble.

Jacob’s 2016-2017 season includes numerous choral/solo appearances with Apollo’s Fire, a complete tour of masses and concerts in each of the Papal Basilicas in Rome, Italy with the Choir of the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, and an expansive series of engagements with Les Canards Chantants including concerts in Beijing, China for the first festival of early music hosted by Central Conservatory of Beijing. In April 2017, Jacob will give recitals with artists of Tempesta di Mare in Philidelphia to celebrate the 450th anniversary of Claudio Monteverdi’s birth.

Jacob is a cantor and chorister at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception. He earned his B.A. in Vocal Performance from University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Jacob teaches private voice lessons in his home in Downtown Sivler Spring, MD. Use the contact form on this website request more information about bookings and teaching.

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DAVID MCFERRIN
baritone

Praised by The Miami Herald for his “commanding stage presence and a voice of seductive beauty,” baritone David McFerrin has won critical acclaim in a wide variety of repertoire.

On the opera stage David has been featured in several recent productions with the Boston Lyric Opera. His performances as the Officer in last season’s BLO production of Philip Glass’ gripping two-character drama In the Penal Colony were widely admired — the Wall Street Journal hailed his portrayal as “disturbingly eloquent.” Other roles with BLO have included King Mark in Martin’s The Love Potion, Cascada in Lehar’s The Merry Widow, Johann in Massenet’s Werther, and Jason McFarlane in Beeson’s Lizzie Borden, performed both in Boston and at the Tanglewood Music Festival. David has also sung with Santa Fe Opera, Seattle Opera, Florida Grand Opera, Opera Boston, Sarasota Opera, and the Rossini Festival in Wildbad, Germany. His roles include Aeneas in Dido and Aeneas, Guglielmo in Così fan tutte, Taddeo in L’Italiana in Algeri and the title role in Britten’s Noye’s Fludde. This season he makes his debut with Boston Baroque as Achilla in Handel’s Giulio Cesare.

David’s solo concert engagements have ranged from Monteverdi’s Vespers of 1610 at St. Mark’s Basilica in Venice to the music of Cole Porter with the Boston Pops. Upcoming highlights include Bach and Monteverdi with the Handel and Haydn Society, Beethoven’s Missa Solemnis, Vaughan Williams’ Five Mystical Songs, and a concert performance of Stephen Paulus’ one-act opera Three Hermits. Last season David was a featured Adams Fellow at the Carmel Bach Festival in California; debuted with the Vermont Symphony and Boston’s groundbreaking chamber orchestra, A Far Cry; returned to the Artist Series of Sarasota in a set of pops performances; and appeared with the Handel and Haydn Society in Boston, Canada, and California. He was also runner-up in the Oratorio Society of New York’s 2016 Lyndon Woodside Solo Competition, the premier contest for this repertoire. Past concert credits include a Carnegie Hall debut with Gustavo Dudamel and the Israel Philharmonic, as well as performances with the Cleveland Orchestra, North Carolina Symphony, San Antonio Symphony, Seraphic Fire in Miami, New York’s TENET, and at the Casals Festival in Puerto Rico. David’s concert repertoire includes Bach’s St. John Passion, B Minor Mass and Christmas Oratorio; Handel’s Messiah, Joshua, and Samson; Haydn’s Creation and Mass in Time of War; Vaughan Williams’ Dona Nobis Pacem; and the requiems of Brahms, Fauré and Duruflé. He is also a regular soloist and baritone section leader for the choirs of Trinity Church Boston, and performs around the country with the renaissance ensemble Blue Heron.

An avid recitalist, David has performed at the Caramoor Festival, the Steans Institute at the Ravinia Festival, and as a Stern Fellow at SongFest in California. He has appeared with Five Boroughs Music Festival and the New York Festival of Song, and completed four summer chamber music residencies at the Marlboro Music Festival in Vermont. This fall he is curating and performing a program of songs from World War I with soprano Deborah Selig and pianist Clifton J. Noble, Jr., to be presented on Veterans Day in Northampton, Massachusetts.

David’s childhood in western Massachusetts was full of music: his choral director mother took him to her rehearsals in a bassinet! He started violin lessons at age five, soon joined a children’s choir, and spent his teen-age years fitting orchestra, musical theatre and a capella group rehearsals around ultimate frisbee practices and outing club treks. A Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Carleton College in music and political economy, he earned graduate degrees at the Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music and the Juilliard School. In 2008 he won 2nd place in the Metropolitan Opera National Council New England Region, and was awarded a Richard F. Gold Career Grant from the Shoshana Foundation, annually given to promising young American singers. He lives in the Boston neighborhood of Roslindale with his wife Erin, a preservationist with the Massachusetts Historical Commission, and their black lab Holly.

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